Home    About Us    Medic-All    Bio B2B    Hot Topic     Expo     Login | Join Now     

Taiwan's Authority in Bone Cancer Treatment and Reconstruction Pioneers New Cryotherapy Techniques

Many bone tumor centers in the world use liquid nitrogen cryotherapy as a precision adjuvant therapy to minimize recurrence of the tumor. As traditional methods see complications in as high as 19% of the cases, Dr. Wu began to develop new techniques. In 2014, Dr. Wu succeeded in developing a method using low-temperature solid ethanol to treat bone sarcoma. The method not only improves upon the shortcomings of using liquid nitrogen but also has been verified to lower the complication rate.

Taiwan's Authority in Bone Cancer Treatment and Reconstruction Pioneers New Cryotherapy Techniques
Primary malignant bone tumors such as osteosarcoma occurs mostly in adolescents. In the past, surgical intervention mostly involved amputation. However, with the advancement of chemotherapy drugs and precision diagnostic instruments, limb salvage surgeries have become mainstream.

Devotion to an Unpopular Field Sets New World Records

Treating bone sarcoma is an unpopular field within orthopedics, with few doctors willing to invest their time and effort in the specialty. However,  Taipei Veterans General Hospital's (VGHTPE) musculoskeletal tumor team is devoted to the field like no other. The team continues to invent new surgical techniques, lower recurrence, and improve the overall cure rate. Along the way, the hospital has accomplished multiple record-breaking clinical achievements. The VGHTPE has had over 600 cases of biological reconstruction (the most in the world), with a 5-year limb salvage rate of 93%, which is well ahead of other developed countries. In the past three years, it also became the first in the world to introduce three cryosurgery techniques: biological freezing device, normal tissue preserving agent for cryosurgeries, and freezing nitrogen ethanol composite (FNEC). These techniques can, respectively, prevent complications from improper healing of the bones, prevent early onset arthritis due to freezing damage to the cartilage, and enhance the operability of cryosurgery. Meanwhile, these techniques are leveraged when developing medical devices to improve the quality of future clinical treatments.

The credit for these accomplishments goes to VGHTPE's Vice Superintendent Dr. Wei-Ming Chen, Chief of Therapeutical and Research Center of Musculoskeletal Tumor Dr. Po-Kuei Wu, and all the team members. With their continued efforts in advancing fundamental research and clinical techniques, they have cultivated VGHTPE into the best of the few hospitals specializing in bone tumors.

Pioneering Low-Temperature Solid Ethanol Production Technique to Rewrite the History of Cryotherapy of Tumors

Many bone tumor centers in the world use liquid nitrogen cryotherapy as a precision adjuvant therapy to minimize the recurrence of the tumor. As traditional methods see complications in as high as 19% of the cases, Dr. Wu began to develop new techniques. In 2014, Dr. Wu succeeded in developing a method using low-temperature solid ethanol to treat bone sarcoma. The method not only improves upon the shortcomings of using liquid nitrogen but also has been verified to lower the complication rate. Between 2015 and 2017, the method had been presented at the World Bone Cancer Conference, Asia Bone Cancer Conference, multinational orthopedics conference, as well as published in renowned medical journals.
To prolong the effect of surgery and provide an integrated service, "we have collaborated with others to develop rehabilitation methods and assistive devices. We have also established a 3D printing center to actively develop customized assistive devices, surgery simulation and guides to improve the quality of life of tumor patients," added Dr. Wu. Current medical trends such as medical 3D printing and precision medicine are anticipated to help improve the outcome for bone tumor treatment.

(Editing by Nicole Yang, Research Center for Biotechnology and Medicine Policy)
 
 
More Topics